10 Ways to Recreate ‘Famous’ Yoga Videos

{This guest post is written by Kaitlin King, the founder of Yoga Soule, a small company that hosts wellness retreats, virtual classes, and educational content from the Italian Riviera. Kaitlin is a rockstar at all things iMovie and is a mentor in our Soulful MBA community.}

Creating delicious yoga videos consistently requires not only discipline, but bravery and a degree of artistry. Like all art, we can learn and borrow from other great artists to improve and build upon our own expressions. Sometimes creating so much video content can simply lose its pizzazz and fun.

Let’s see what some of the rock stars in the online yoga industry are doing with their yoga videos that makes them so successful, engaging, and enjoyable. Consider this a Pinterest board for your Namastream channel 😉

  1. Meghan Currie’s Cody Series

Meghan Currie’s language around yoga is vivid, personified, and sensory, which, in and of itself creates a new relationship to movement in her classes. Her class bundle themes—Loving Spoonfuls, Moved by Nature, Delicious Flows—are rooted in the idea of taste, bringing the focus of her unique sequencing to experimentation and presence. And to top it off, the visuals of her classes are simply stunning.

Now, of course, not all of us have access to shooting videos on a tropical beach or a negative edge swimming pool, but what we can recreate are the 3 angles in her videos. You’ll notice as she is moving from pose to pose, the video cuts between 3 angles—straight on facing her lengthwise mat, at a diagonal to the upper right, and at a diagonal to the rear left of her mat.

With all the atypical poses and variations in her sequences and the distinctive nature of her cues, it’s nice to be able to get clear picture of what exactly she is doing, from all perspectives.

Get her look and feel by setting up a single camera in 3 different positions, filming the sequence once in each. Match together the clips in post-production, according to what helps your viewers the most.

Key Takeaways: creative class themes, 3-angle camera setup

  1. Kino MacGregor’s BeFit Series

Kino has such a bubbly, relatable personality, and she takes advantage of this by talking directly to the camera throughout her beginner classes for BeFit, as though looking right at you the viewer.

She’s able to do this using a wireless lavalier mic to capture her voice in high quality, recording her audio and video simultaneously.

And remember those postcard shooting locations? Kino’s background is just a home living room, but it feels inviting, professional and crisp.

Get the look by clearing out any clutter, moving out the area rug, and angling your mat towards your most photogenic corner—this will create the illusion of a larger space and thus more breathing room, even more than filming directly in front of a wall.

Key Takeaways: lavalier mic, film in the center of a 90-degree corner

  1. Patrick Beach’s “Vinyasa Flow”

Thinking of filming a live class with students participating along with you? Check these videos out!

Patrick puts his students in two lines facing one another, and teaches from the middle of the configuration. This allows the viewer to get a view right down the middle, of 3 perspectives of the pose all at once (like that 3-angle trick from Meghan Currie).

The camera also does a lot of Ken Burns scanning, meaning that you’ll see the camera panning up and down and side to side quite frequently during some of the more difficult poses.

You can recreate this in post-production, even with a still camera, using “Ken Burns crop” in any video editing tool. Patrick’s high energy keeps the class engaging, and he has no fear challenging his students with inversions — even in such a precarious positioning!

Key Takeaways: set-up for filming live classes, Ken Burns crop

  1. Rachel Brathen

What about filming yourself teaching a private class with one student as a demonstrator?

Yoga Girl, Rachel Brathen, provides strong verbal cues in her series for her yoga video collective site, and also talks about how she is adjusting the student practicing. This additional information is helpful for those watching at home, as it’s almost as if you can feel the adjustment yourself.

Rachel also does shorter instructional videos with specific props, a couple videos of healthy recipes, and even has a class where she practices just in a chair, guiding an office yoga class.

She has some clever ways to take advantage of the freedom you get from teaching yoga off the traditional mat!

Key Takeaways: teaching one-on-one, filming off the mat

  1. Kathryn Budig’s “Aim True” Series for Giam

Kathryn uses the tried and true audio technique of using a voiceover in this class series, and it’s nice to see how it vibes and flows here.

She responds physically to her own cues, like for example shaking her head “no” when demonstrating incorrect alignment. She does a great job making the class seem natural and seamless.

You can create the voiceover effect by recording your class audio beforehand, and then playing it back while filming the asana. This video in the series on trouble poses is also fun and unique in that it is not a flow class with sequencing but instead, a series of poses divided into sections building up to a highlighted pose. The video moves from one section to another with text covers moving the video right along–an interesting idea to mix up your offerings on Namastream for your students wanting to focus on specific postures.

Key Takeaways: voiceover technique, pose-based class

Here are some additional Pin-worthy yoga videos to explore:

  1. Shiva Rea for Yoga International: For her dreamy sequencing and minimalist outdoor background.
  2. Leslie of Fightmaster Yoga: For her approachable video production. She keeps it simple with a still camera and voiceover cues added in post-production.
  3. All of Bad Yogi: For miss Erin Motz’ straight-forward, anti-perfection, down-to-earth teaching style and setting. Her humor alone is sure to get you out of those weird yoga teacher funks.
  4. Boho Beautiful’s “Expand Your Practice”: For those wanting to flex their post-production skills, Juliana uses a picture-in-a-picture (PIP) screen to demonstrate various modifications in poses. She also always cuts away during the flow to zoom in on tricky binds.
  5. “Ashtanga Fundamentals” with Laruga Glaser: For a different view at the 3-angle trick, from a low ground-level perspective, to cropped zoom-ins, all of the filming from My Yoga TV by Alessandro Sigismondi is simply beautiful, and this video is a perfect example. Check out this other video collaboration with Laruga for more proof.

Now, go roll out your mat, set up your tripod, and get to work filming the next yoga video masterpiece!

10 Ways to Recreate ‘Famous’ Yoga Videos: Creating delicious yoga videos consistently requires not only discipline, but bravery and a degree of artistry. Let’s see what some of the rock stars in the online yoga industry are doing with their yoga videos that makes them so successful, engaging, and enjoyable. Consider this a Pinterest board for your Namastream channel
10 Ways to Recreate ‘Famous’ Yoga Videos: Creating delicious yoga videos consistently requires not only discipline, but bravery and a degree of artistry. Let’s see what some of the rock stars in the online yoga industry are doing with their yoga videos that makes them so successful, engaging, and enjoyable. Consider this a Pinterest board for your Namastream channel
10 Ways to Recreate ‘Famous’ Yoga Videos: Creating delicious yoga videos consistently requires not only discipline, but bravery and a degree of artistry. Let’s see what some of the rock stars in the online yoga industry are doing with their yoga videos that makes them so successful, engaging, and enjoyable. Consider this a Pinterest board for your Namastream channel

RYT Kaitlin King is the founder of Yoga Soule, a small company that hosts wellness retreats, virtual classes, and educational content from the Italian Riviera. She teaches yoga in 4 languages all over the world, but the pizza is what convinces her to spend most of her time in Italy. Yoga Soule’s acclaimed iMovie for Yogis course helps yogi-preneurs expand their businesses with video, and she is committed to empowering fellow instructors in strategic, authentic, online growth. Check out her yoga videos here, and hang out with her in Italy virtually on Instagram.

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